Monthly Archives: February 2015

What are you reading?

Nick Nigro wants to know what you are reading now, and what are the top two books you’d recommend to others.

Nick Nigro of Davis College discusses popular and influential books at a meeting of the Boomers Resource Network. Photo by David Yonke

Nick Nigro of Davis College discusses popular and influential books at a meeting of the Boomers Resource Network. Photo by David Yonke

Speaking at a recent meeting of the Boomers Resource Network, Nigro — the careers services director at Davis College — reviewed a list of the most influential books and also some readers’ favorites.

Topping the 2015 Smart Choice Ratings’ list of most influential books was “Things Fall Apart” by Chinua Achebe, a novel set in pre-colonial Nigeria. Second on the list was “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” by Douglas Adams.

Nigro also led a discussion of an AARP Magazine survey listing baby boomers’ Top 10 books:

1. The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger

2. Catch 22 by Joseph Heller

3. Roots by Alex Haley

4. In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

5. Lord of the Flies by William Golding

6. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

7. Slaughter House 5 by Kurt Vonnegut

8. The Color Purple by Alice Walker

9. The Joy of Sex by Dr. Alex Comfort

and 10. The World According to Garp by John Irving.

Citing his personal favorites, Nigro offered his own Top 10 book recommendations:

1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

2. Celebrate the Sun by James Kavanaugh

3. Lost Symbol by Dan Brown

4. 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey

5. Fully Alive by Ken Davis

6. The Gift of Fear by Gavin De Becker

7. Unconditional Love by John Powell

8. The Tree that Survived the Winter by Mary Fahy

9. Wilfrid Gordon McDondald Partridge by Mem Fox

and 10. Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl.

 

Feasting on Farm to Table fare

Scott Bowman wants you to eat well by eating food made from scratch using local ingredients.

Scotty Bowman speaks about Fowl and Fodder and the "Farm to Table" concept at a Boomers Resource Network meeting. Photo by David Yonke

Scotty Bowman speaks about Fowl and Fodder and the “Farm to Table” concept at a Boomers Resource Network meeting. Photo by David Yonke

That’s the goal of Fowl and Fodder, Bowman’s “Farm to Table” restaurant that opened July 17, 2014 (located at 7408 W. Central Avenue, Toledo, OH 43617).

Bowman was the featured speaker at a recent Boomers Resource Network meeting, explaining the story behind Fowl and Fodder.

After working as manager of several restaurants in a prominent national chain, Bowman ventured on his own to create his kind of restaurant — one that uses organic practices, serving grass-fed beef, artisan cheeses, locally grown produce, and fresh baked bread. In this environment, there is nothing better than to read the blog sportrinn.wordpress.com.

The menu features a large selection of sandwiches including Steak Sandwich, Tempura Meatloaf, Duck Tacos, Duck Pastrami, Grilled Cheese and Cuban-Style Panini.

It also offers a variety of soups and salads, plus sides such as Tater Tots with Srirachup, Wilted Swiss Chard, and Sweet Potatoes with Maple Balsamic Sauce.

Fowl and Fodder was a long time coming, as Bowman invested his family funds and then raised another $20,000 through a crowd-funded Kickstarter campaign.

Bowman said it’s a win-win situation when people can eat healthy and at the same time support the local economy.

The restaurant, at 7408 W. Central Ave., Toledo 43617, is open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. for regular dining. A juice bar is open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

More information is available at fowlandfodder.com or by calling 419-690-2490.

Library isn’t just about books

The library isn’t just about books these days. It’s a vast resource providing tremendous amounts of information — from help finding a job, researching alternative health issues, or analyzing stocks — accessible from your home computer.

Linda Fayerweather, business-technology specialist for the Toledo Lucas County Public Library.

Linda Fayerweather, business-technology specialist for the Toledo Lucas County Public Library.

Linda Fayerweather, business-technology specialist for the Toledo-Lucas County Public Library, gave a broad overview of the library’s programs, classes, databases and resources in a one-hour talk on Thursday (Nov. 6) at the weekly Boomers Resource Network meeting.

In addition to stocking 2.5 million books at the library’s 18 branches, there are thousands of downloadable books, audiobooks, videos and magazines that can be read on laptops, desktop computers, tablets, and Kindles or other e-readers.

Numerous databases are available through the library’s website, toledolibrary.org, including genealogy, biographies, health information, and tax and legal forms. You can even look things up in Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia.

Free classes on computer basics are offered weekly at the Kent Branch Library on Collingwood Boulevard, and a “Business Boost” program will guide business owners in the use of the library’s resources “to gain the competitive edge.”

Most library programs are funded by the state and county and are free to the public, Fayerweather added.

For more information, contact Linda Fayerweather at 419-259-5244 or linda.fayerweather@toledolibrary.org.